art & museums

Rock & Roll Blues Museum

UPDATE 2019— We are sad to say that Theo will be closing the Museum in March 2019 unless a buyer takes the
entire collection and continues the project.    If no buyer is found, a SALE of the items will take place in March.

THE ROCK & BLUES MUSEUM OPENS ONE MORE TIME IN JANUARY DURING THE CLARKSDALE FILM FESTIVAL; CLOSING ITS DOORS IN MARCH 2019.

The Rock & Blues Museum will be open for the IBC and the Clarksdale Film Festival on the following days:
January 18, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28 and 29 from 10 am to 5 pm. (The museum will NOT be open on Sunday, January 20th and Sunday, January 27th.)

The Rock & Blues Museum will open again on March 22 and 23 (Friday and Saturday) for a final closing sale. The non-profit Rock N Roll Museum, Inc. will no longer operate the museum as of March 31, 2019, and the museum will close its doors at that time.

The Board of Directors would like to thank all of our supporters during the last 13 years in making the Rock & Blues Museum so successful it was vote #5 of the Best Mississippi Attractions by USA TODAY’s People’s Choice Awards in 2018!

The museum building and the memorabilia collection are for sale and hopefully a buyer can be found that will continue the operation of the museum.

Theo Dasbach

113 East 2nd Street
Clarksdale

www.blues2rock.com

Delta Blues Museum

The Delta Blues Museum was established in 1979. This internationally-acclaimed museum showcases the history and significance of the Blues in this region. It features a wax figure of Blues great Muddy Waters and the famous Muddywood Guitar, videotape and slide-and-sound programs, photographs, recordings, books, memorabilia, archives, and much more. Stovall Plantation was the original home of the Muddy Waters Cabin, which is now located in its new home at the renovated Freight Depot on Blues Alley.

#1 Blues Alley
Clarksdale
Tel: (662) 627-6820
www.deltabluesmuseum.org

Admission:
Adult $7.00
Children $5.00 (ages 6-12)
Under 6 – Free

Cathead Delta Blues & Folk Art, Inc.

Cat Head Story

Cat Head is named after three things (in reverse order): "cat head biscuits" (a Southern biscuit the size of a cat's head), animal-themed blues record labels (Alligator, Fat Possum, Rooster, etc.) and the "cat head" drawings of Leland, Mississippi, bluesman/folk artist Pat Thomas.


A deejay here once labeled me "Clarksdale's Blues Ambassador." Kinda nice. I'll take it.

Hi. I’m Roger Stolle. Cat Head is my place.

Cat Head is Mississippi's Blues Store, but honestly, I never set out to own a record store or art gallery or souvenir stand (or whatever the heck this thing is). I set out to fulfill a mission.

In 2002, I moved to what some called a “dying” town to organize and promote from within.

How did I end up in Clarksdale, and what am I “organizing and promoting,” exactly? Well, I’m glad you asked.

Much of what follows is excerpted from the Introduction to my book, Hidden History of Mississippi Blues (The History Press/Arcadia Publishing). You really should treat yourself to a copy. Just sayin'...

I grew up in a family that didn’t really listen to much music. My dad loved talk radio. My mom had a few dusty albums we rarely played. And my older sister mostly kept her pop records hidden from her less cool, younger brother.

This all changed on the morning of August 17th, 1977.

Read more...

Source: https://www.cathead.biz/

Blues Alley

This renovated passenger train depot, located on Blues Alley, now houses the Dutch Oven pastry, pie and cake bakery and sandwich/soup shop. The Dutch Oven specializes in quality baked items in the tradition of its Mennonite proprietors. The historic depot has been refurbished to its original condition both inside and out. There is a performance hall and restaurant space available for lease by private entrepreneurs seeking space in the Blues Alley area. There are also four other retail spaces available for private lease such as an art studio, souvenir shop, bookstore, music store and other such tourist-related ventures. Together, Clarksdale Station, the Delta Blues Museum, the former Greyhound Bus Station, and Ground Zero Blues Club make up Blues Alley.

Hopson Plantation Commissary

The Hopson Plantation Commissary stands today in much the same condition as in its glory days over fifty years ago. The building is full of antique and historical items which create a nostalgic atmosphere reminiscent of the deep south Delta

Cotton had always required a large amount of hand labor, at one time over a million families to raise 22 million acres of cotton.

In 1935 the Hopson Plantation began a monumental changeover to become one of the first completely mechanized cotton operations in the world. In the fall of 1944, International Harvester introduced the first cotton picker on the Hopson farm making it the first in the world to grow and harvest a commercial acreage of cotton produced completely by mechanical methods.

From planting, to cultivating, to irrigating, to harvesting, to ginning, the Hopson enterprise became the showplace of Delta farming.

Read more...

Tennessee Williams

Clarksdale is the childhood home of one of America’s most performed playwrights, Tom “Tennessee” Williams.

Young Tom’s grandfather Rev. Walter E. Dakin served as rector of St. George’s Episcopal Church from 1917-1932. Williams lived with his grandparents in Clarksdale for several years, and then visited regularly as he grew up. The church is still active today, and the former rectory is now the church office and home of the Tennessee Williams Rectory Museum.

If you visit in the fall, please join us for the 3-day Mississippi DeltaTennessee Williams Festival, held each October since 1992, which includes a kickoff party at the Cutrer Mansion; site-specific performances by local and visiting actors; talks by noted Williams scholars; Clarksdale and Delta history; student monologue and scene competition; and Porch Plays: works by Williams performed on porches in Clarksdale’s historic district. For the next festival dates & schedule please visit www.DeltaWilliamsFestival.com.

Williams’ plays and films set in or influenced by the Mississippi Delta include: SPRING STORM, BATTLE OF ANGELS, THE GLASS MENAGERIE, A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE, SUMMER AND SMOKE, CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF, 27 WAGONS FULL OF COTTON, THIS PROPERTY IS CONDEMNED, ORPHEUS DESCENDING, THE ECCENTRICITIES OF A NIGHTINGALE, BABY DOLL, KINGDOM OF EARTH and THE LOSS OF A TEARDROP DIAMOND as well as many other short plays, stories and poems.

Williams drew on his Clarksdale neighbors for famous character names such as Blanche, Stella, Brick, Baby Doll, Cutrer, and Wingfield. Their stories are told in the new Tennessee Williams Rectory Museum. The museum is currently open by appointment and during festivals. (Call 646 465 1578) or email RectoryMuseum@gmail.com to schedule, please allow at least 24 hours.)

Tennessee Williams’ plays have won two Pulitzer prizes. More of his plays have been made into Hollywood movies than any other playwright except Shakespeare. THE GLASS MENAGERIE, A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE, and CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF are consistently named on lists of the greatest plays of all time.